Havana Perspective
Jun14

Havana Perspective

Running Through Havana A New Lens on Havana Understanding the flow of Cuban life begins at the artery of the Old City, Calle Obispo. Formed of piece-mealed cobblestone and sand (occasionally broken up to reveal new fiber-optic cable), Calle Obispo’s streets run from the northernmost point from Parque Central south to Plaza de Arms. El Floridita bar crowns the north, made famous by Hemingway, an homage to the power of the pen. The...

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Inaugural Journey to Cuba for U.S. Citizens Set for September
Jul21

Inaugural Journey to Cuba for U.S. Citizens Set for September

DOWNERS GROVE, IL – July 18, 2011: For decades, the allure of Cuba has remained just out of reach for most Americans. Thanks to amended regulations, Americans may now travel to Cuba legally in the experienced hands of global luxury travel company Abercrombie & Kent. This September, A&K will operate an inaugural journey to Cuba for U.S. citizens, followed by five additional departures this year – revealing the destination with...

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The Havana Forest
Jun15

The Havana Forest

I love walking through the Havana Forest on a hot afternoon.  The sound of the water is soothing and the trees provide great shade.  The Havana Forest runs along the Almendares River and many locals fish here. The best time to go is when it has rained recently, when the forest is most lush.  The green canopy-like plants that cover the trees in the forest are exotic and beautiful looking.  I took a couple of avid bird-watchers that I...

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A Walk Along the Malecon, Cuba
May24

A Walk Along the Malecon, Cuba

One of my favorite evening activities in Havana is to go for a walk along the Malecon. Eight kilometres long, I often walk the whole seawall twice, since my husband and I live at one end of it. Sunset is the best time to go walking, since the view of Old Havana is fantastic. When I want a break partway through, I sometimes go into the Hotel Nacional, to have a drink at the bar in the wonderful gardens there. The hotel is on top of a...

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Casa de Huevos in Cuba
May16

Casa de Huevos in Cuba

My favorite place for coffee in Havana is Casa de Huevos in Old Havana. The name literally translates to mean “House of Eggs.” There are a few tables at one side of the restaurant, where I have sat on a few occasions to order fried eggs in a nest of French fries.  Casa de Huevos is a local café and not many tourists hang out here.  Espresso costs just a peso, which is around 5 cents American and there is often a lineup to get a midday...

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Cienfuegos in Cuba, Founded by French Immigrants

The area around what is now the city of Cienfuegos was originally called Cacicazgo de Jagua by the indigenous peoples. In 1819, the city became the only one in Cuba to be founded by French immigrants, who arrived from Bordeaux and Louisiana. The city’s original name was Fernardina de Jagua, in honour of the king of Spain, Ferdinand VII but after 10 years it was renamed Cienfuegos as a show of thanks to the Spanish Governor who had...

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Havana’s Capitol Building

The Capitol Building in Havana, inaugurated in 1929, is based on the Capitol Building in Washington DC, but, at nearly 300 feet high, is slightly taller. It is best viewed in the early morning from the Parque Central. The sun was behind me and I gained a great perspective of the building’s imposing nature from slightly further away. From here I could also appreciate fully the delicate architecture of the Gran Teatro de La Habana and...

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Searching for Che in Argentina

On my third day in BA, having seen some of the major districts, I thought it time for an off the beaten track adventure (city style that is).  In the guide book map a friend found a marker signifying a Che Guevara Museum out at the end of the green line, but further digging into the book did not produce any more information.  Just a small museum symbol and a number on a black and white map and nothing more. Upon arriving in the outer...

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Cuba Anyone?

When Fidel Castro lets go of the reins of power — however it happens — visiting Cuba will become attractive to U.S. citizens once again. However, the laws that have prevented easy travel to the Caribbean nation since 1963 won’t go away overnight. Castro’s probable successor will be his brother, Raúl, and will most likely follow current policies, which the US government disagrees. So, he too will need to step aside too....

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