Namibia

New Southern Africa Adventure

Posted by on 8:56 am in Announcements, Botswana News, Namibia, South Africa, Zimbabwe | 0 comments

New Southern Africa Adventure

Overseas Adventure Travel Announces New Southern Africa Adventure for Late 2013     Trip begins at $265 per day and single supplements are free BOSTON, April 9, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — In response to high demand for safaris and cultural immersion trips in Southern Africa, Overseas Adventure Travel (OAT) is launching a new small group adventure beginning in October 2013. The 17-day Southern Africa: South Africa, Zimbabwe, Namibia, and Botswana trip begins at $4495, or just $265 per day, and includes free single supplements for solo...

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Namibia Safari from African Travel, Inc.

Posted by on 8:46 am in Announcements, Namibia | 0 comments

Namibia Safari from African Travel, Inc.

Get the Best of Namibia with African Travel, Inc. Rare White Rhino Sightings Often a Bonus in Namibia The Great Sand Sea in Namibia is home to some of the tallest sand dunes on earth, and these spectacular natural wonders are just a part of the amazing adventure travelers will enjoy on African Travel, Inc.’s Best of Namibia Wing Safari Guided Adventure. From touring in 4x4s through the towering dunes of the Kulala Wilderness Reserve to rhino tracking in Etosha National Park, the expert safari specialists at African Travel, Inc. can help plan...

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Air Namibia Grows Intra-Africa Network

Posted by on 2:00 pm in Announcements, Namibia | 0 comments

Air Namibia Grows Intra-Africa Network

On April 11, Air Namibia launched three new routes for regional destinations. The three new additional routes will add significant capacity to the regional operations, with more flexible connecting times. The Harare, Ondjiva and Gaborone, routes are the ninth additional to SW regional flights, serviced by Embraer ERJ-135 aircrafts, offering direct connection from the international hub. Air Namibia Grows Domestic Network in Windhoek. The flights are timed to ensure easy connections from various points of SW geographically focused route network...

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Little Known Migrations from Acacia Africa

Posted by on 1:01 pm in Announcements, Botswana, Kenya, Namibia, South Africa | 0 comments

Little Known Migrations from Acacia Africa

The Annual Migration in the Masai Mara is without a doubt one of the main reasons to opt for a safari holiday, but Acacia Africa has uncovered some less well-known migratory extravaganzas, with opportunities to view some spectacular wildlife including, celebrity sharks, dragonflies, and literally, millions of sardines. Dubbed “the greatest shoal on earth,” the sardine run on South Africa’s Wild Coast holds two titles – the world’s largest animal migration also featuring the greatest gathering of predators on the planet. Sharks, dolphins, Cape...

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Lower Zambezi, Higher Cost

Posted by on 11:00 am in ITKT Blogs, Namibia, Zambia | 0 comments

Africa’s national parks differ a lot from country to country and they are run in very different ways, so I never know what to expect next. In South Africa and Namibia, the parks are over-organized operations with gates, curfews and strict rules, though I found them somewhat bendable despite constant ranger patrols. In bureaucratic Botswana, the seemingly dead plains of the Kalahari Desert are empty from any regime, and, even though certain things are frowned upon, you can easily feel one with the animal kingdom and abide by its much...

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Private Parts in Zambia

Posted by on 10:09 am in Africa, ITKT Blogs, Namibia, Zambia | 1 comment

I am far from a nun, extremely comfortable with my body, and if you describe me as “shy” in front of anybody who even remotely knows me – they’d laugh in your face. That said, I would like to think I’m all about respect. Respecting other cultures and their degrees of modesty are highly important during the sort of travel I enjoy most. However, in Africa I officially declare myself confused by modesty regulations and locations of the private parts. On the surface, Africa doesn’t have a very “reserved”...

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Leaving Namibia, or How to Find a Pangolin

Posted by on 11:07 am in Africa, ITKT Blogs, Namibia | 0 comments

I hate to leave Namibia – it has been so good to me. But my last days here weren’t without memorable adventures. I wondered if the day would come when Columbus would drown in the thick mud it often has to go through. And that day nearly came. Mamili National Park was going to be the last on my list in this country. It was almost completely flooded and looked deserted. A few successful river crossings finally led to an unsuccessful one. My team and I found ourselves spinning our wheels in what the locals call “black...

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Border-less Wildlife

Posted by on 10:58 am in Angola, Botswana, ITKT Blogs, Namibia | 0 comments

Border-less Wildlife

On the little stretch of Caprivi, where the colonial politics of the past have arbitrarily divided the land into Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, and Angola, wildlife knows no borders. The river here serves as the divide, and its name changes every hundred miles or so. Birds here are as colorful as I’ve ever seen. Carmine bee-eaters sunbathe on low branches, and I photograph them in all their magnificence as they let me get surprisingly close. Neither them nor the elephants that cross the river need passports. I wish I had the same kind of...

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Caprivi People

Posted by on 10:58 am in Africa, Botswana, Namibia | 0 comments

Namibia differs from Botswana like day from night, except for Namibia’s Caprivi Strip. On a map, it looks like the neck of a guitar, and stretches for over three hundred kilometers west to east, although it’s only thirty to seventy kilometers wide. Along its seldom used roads are scattered tiny mud-huts and skinny livestock. Most of the structures are round, with a frame of thick branches and walls made of cow dung-sand mix. Once I asked villagers if they’d ever attempted building walls of elephant dung (just seems like an...

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Chameleon Africa

Posted by on 9:44 am in Africa, ITKT Blogs, Namibia | 0 comments

Africa is a chameleon. I am only a day’s drive away from Etosha – my most recent never-ending fountain of wildlife, and it’s like I’ve landed on a different planet with its own magnificent and diverse population of birds and antelopes. Reminding me of my South American darling, the jabiru, saddlebill storks rummage through the reeds with their incredibly colorful bills, spread their enormous sail-like wings, and get away from me as I chase them around the swamp knee-deep in mud. In the presence of the saddlebills,...

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Five-Hour Photo

Posted by on 8:29 am in Africa, ITKT Blogs, Namibia | 0 comments

She lay in wait and so did I. How famished she must have been, if only watching her hunt I’ve become so hungry I’ve risked getting out of the car, fetching my gasoline camping stove, and cooking up a hearty meal right there in the back seat of my double-cab truck. What torture it must have been, to see the springbok inch towards her hiding place near a waterhole, and keep her tired paws perfectly still and ready to pounce for the prey. She was my prey and I got her – skidding in a sharp turn, tail high up in the air like a...

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About One Little Himba

Posted by on 9:41 am in Africa, ITKT Blogs, Namibia | 0 comments

“Ask her what her favorite thing to do is,” I said. Jaco asked, and the little fifteen year-old Himba replied that it was cooking. She looked so precious, healthy, happy, but then also so alien to me. She was naked from the waist up, except for a few strings of beads and a thick collar on her neck indicating she was still unwed. At 16 she would already be too old for marriage, so her betrothed was already chosen for her. This arranged marriage would in no way conflict with the relationship she already has with another man. He is...

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Click n’ Clack

Posted by on 5:46 pm in Africa, ITKT Blogs, Namibia | 3 comments

I’ve been lucky recently with good guides. It is especially pleasant when you don’t want or need one, but they are being forced on you by regulations of the place you are visiting, like in Namibia’s Brandberg — home to some of the world’s most famous rock art dating as far back as two thousand years. Gwen, a local Damara girl and our assigned guide, was the only woman guide in Brandberg and, once I got her talking, told me all about how difficult it was to even apply for this job as a woman. The association...

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Cats and Caves

Posted by on 11:00 am in Africa, ITKT Blogs, Namibia | 0 comments

I feel caged in big cities sometimes, so I was more than happy to get back to Nature, even though it meant climbing down into the musty and stinky Arnhem Caves of Namibia in search of bats. Ankle-deep in guano, we searched in the darkness for flying creatures with big teeth or funny horseshoe-shaped noses, disturbing their sleep. As long as we used red light, the bats were not bothered much. Only on dead mummified “vampires” could I use the full force of my flash. Hanging just as they died – still upside down, clutching to...

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Red Sands of Sossusvlei

Posted by on 10:33 am in Adventure, Africa, ITKT Blogs, Namibia | 0 comments

Sossusvlei has waited for me long enough. Seeing it in the first light of dawn made me want to run along the crest of the nearest dune and not stop until I reach the sun. However, scaling the sand dunes is hard work. Eventually, I took off my shoes and, packing more and more red grains of sand into the thick woven fabric of my hiking socks, dug my feet into the dunes, crest after crest. Breaking the facets of sand mountains, perfectly shaped by wind throughout the night, was pure fun. I was first to get to the dunes that morning. Got up in...

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