The LA to BA Evening Difference

Friday night in Los Angeles consists of 8PM dinner followed by an hour or two of meandering: self-maintenance like eyebrows or nail polish while watching bad television, getting ready around 10PM, pre-club time by 10:30/11PM, which leads to a 10:30-12 club arrival. By 2AM you are heading home or to late night meal.

Every night in Buenos Aires consists of 10PM dinner, meandering until 1 or 2AM, and then partying till dawn. So the way I see it, there is a two-hour partying time difference, which I cannot seem to set my watch to as determined as Joy, my travel buddy, and I am to conquer.

Our first full day in BA, we decided to head back to our hotel around 5:30PM after a day of sightseeing.  This gave me plenty of time to nap, read, write, before going out for a 10PM dinner, which would set us up for a long evening out on the town. 

UNFORTUNATELY, on the walk back to the hotel, we stumbled upon a the Rey Castro Bar (King Castro) with signs adorned with Castro’s bearded profile. We stopped to take a few novelty photos when I saw a sign promoting the 2 for 1 happy hour special — that was the beginning of the end.

Inside we sat at the dark wooded bar surrounded by Communist Cuban paraphernalia and bare brick walls that gave the feeling of a 1920s speakeasy. There we ordered drinks making a pact to have one drink each (making the best of the 2 for 1 special) before heading back to continue our plan. 

UNFORTUNATELY, our young rosy-cheeked bartender informed us that the deal was per person. This, of course, led to a 2nd drink which made us giddy enough for a third, which then forced a forth. 

Two hours later, having deprived ourselves of dinner for the coveted 10 o’clock hour, we stumbled back to our hotel and passed out fully-clothed by 9PM, only wake up at 4AM (prime dancing/drinking hour) to takes turns yacking in the communal toilets from our striking hangovers.

Maybe I´ll try again tomorrow. 

Author: Xochitl-Julisa Bermejo

Born and raised in Los Angeles, Xochitl-Julisa is a staunch urbanite. When traveling she finds the metro train an essential experience in understanding city life around the world. She recently quit her job as a high school teacher to focus on her writing which includes publishing a book of poetry. Currently she has no job, no apartment and a ticket to Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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