MALAGA, Spain, December 9, 2005 – Malaga will commemorate its most famous native son next March when the Museo Picasso Málaga kicks off a full year of exhibitions and activities. For the 125th anniversary of Pablo Picasso’s birth, the museum in Malaga will present “The Picassos of Antibes,” “Exhibition of Photographs by Michel Sima” and “Picasso: The Female Figure.” A series of special lectures, workshops, courses and activities for children and families are being organized and three publications will be issued. Additionally in 2006, the Museo Picasso will receive 29 new loans of paintings like Standing Nude, Suzanna and the Elders, and Father and Child; sculptures including Woman on Pedestal (Reclining Swimmer) and Feminine Form and a series of rarely-seen drawings. These new pieces added to the more than 200 works in the museum will take visitors on a journey through the fascinating obra of Picasso from his first academic studies to his neoclassical figures, from the overlapping perspectives of Cubism to his experiments in ceramics, from the re-workings of Old Masters to his later paintings in the 1970s. The Museo Picasso’s collection encompasses his groundbreaking innovations and his wide range of styles, materials and techniques.

When Picasso received an offer in 1946 to use one of the great rooms in the Grimaldi Castle at Antibes as a studio, he was enthusiastic. “I’m not only going to paint, I’ll decorate the museum too.” The resulting series of paintings and drawings reflected the jubilant spirit – the joie de vivre – of a country that was free once more. Later Picasso added sculptures, ceramics and graphic works to this collection, France’s first museum dedicated to Picasso which was inaugurated in 1966. From March 13 to June 11, “The Picassos of Antibes” will showcase 73 works – never before seen in Spain – from the Musée Picasso, Antibes. Some of the outstanding works including drawings, ceramics, paintings like Joie de Vivre, Antipolis and Man Gulping Sea Urchins and the sculpture Head of a Woman with Chignon have never been exhibited outside of Antibes. This exhibition, coinciding with the refurbishment of the Musée Picasso, will travel to the Museu Picasso in Barcelona and later to Venice and Münster. “The Picassos of Antibes” exhibitions in Malaga and Barcelona are being organized by the Musée Picasso, Antibes, the Museo Picasso Málaga and the Museu Picasso in Barcelona.

Complimenting the “Picassos of Antibes” and running concurrently is the “Exhibition of Photographs by Michel Sima” also from the Musée Picasso, Antibes. Born in Poland, Sima moved to Paris in 1929 becoming friends with several artists including Picasso. His images portray the context in which Picasso created his art during this period. In fact, it was Sima who suggested a meeting between the Malagan

artist and the curator of Grimaldi Castle who subsequently invited him to use part of it as his studio.

A third exhibition, “Picasso: The Female Figure,” running from October 2006 to February 2007 will illustrate the important role women played as an artistic subject for Picasso. Seventy rarely-shown paintings, drawings and sculptures will explore the powerful female presence that pervades his opus. Most of the works are portraits and nudes from the first decade of the 20th century when his muse was Fernande Olivier and from the artist’s final years (from the late 1940s to the early 1970s) which he spent with his second wife, Jacqueline Roque. Many of these works from the later period belonged to Roque and are now in private and public collections in France and the U.S.

The Museo Picasso opened in 2003 in the heart of Málaga’s historic district and is housed in the Buenavista Palace built between 1516 and 1542 by Jewish converts. Restored by Richard Gluckman working with Isabel Camara and Rafael Martin Delgado, the building is a prime example of civilian Andalusian architecture. The original collection of 204 works includes 42 oil paintings, 11 sculptures, 89 sketches, 73 prints and 24 ceramic pieces and represents all stages of Picasso’s artistic life. Among them are such masterpieces as: The Girl and Her Doll, Olga Kokhlova with Mantille, Man, Woman and Child, Jacqueline Sitting and Pablo’s Portrait with a White Cap.

Entrance to the collection of the Museo Picasso Málaga costs about $7, or 6 euros. Tickets to the temporary exhibition are about $5.30, or 4.50 euros and tickets for both are $9.40, or 8 euros. Seniors over 65, children between the ages of 11 and 16, students and groups of more than 20 persons pay 50 percent of the admission. Children 10 years of age and younger are admitted free. Opening hours are Tuesdays to Thursdays and Sundays and holidays from 10 AM to 8 PM and Fridays and Saturdays from 10 AM to 9 PM. Closed Mondays and on December 25 and January 1. The museum is located at Calle San Augustín, 8. Telephone: 011-34-952-12-76-00 or 011-34-902-44-33-77 or go to www.museopicassomalaga.org. For information about the exhibition in Barcelona, check the web site at www.museupicasso.bcn.es

For further information about Spain, contact the Tourist Office of Spain, at 1-212-265-8822 or www.spain.info

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